Friday, January 14, 2011

Super Sculpture

Francesco Queirolo, Il Disinganno, 1752-4, Sansevero Chapel, Naples
Jean-Baptiste Pigalle, Monument for Henri-Claude d'Harcourt, 1774, Notre Dame, Paris
M.C. Wyatt, Monument to Princess Charlotte, 1818, St George's Chapel, Windsor
Louis Francois Roubiliac, Tomb of Sir Joseph and Lady Elizabeth Nightingale, 1761, Westminster Abbey


Antonio Corradini, La Pudicizia (Modesty), 1752, Napels, Sansevero Chapel, Naples

8 comments:

Alisa said...

I knew the last one (or a similar one) before. It is amazing how the artist can make stone seem transparent! But the web in the first one is even more impressive. Good finds!

Heather Carroll said...

It's hard to believe that the first one was made from a single block of stone!

MarySimonsen said...

Wonderful selection of sculpture. Prince Charlotte's monument is particularly touching. Unlike her parents, George IV and Queen Caroline, Charlotte really was loved by the British, but died after childbirth. Thank you.

Can't See Sheep said...

These always amaze me when I see them. The first, getting the stone to mimic such flexible nets, it blows me away. And the last one the "material" looks so sheer & the way it drapes, the flowers, it's always incredible to see such delicacy conjured out of something so strong, challenging & solid as stone! Thank you for posting these. :)

Rebecca said...

Interesting sculptures, but i've always wondered why most sculptures are of half-naked people.

dorothywillis said...

Great technical skill in these, and they certainly show a lot of Romantic elements for monuments (except for Princess Charlotte's) of the Age of Reason. I am afraid they are a bit too much for me, particularly Death jabbing with what I have heard described as a "toasting fork." And it is amusing that Modesty is so immodest!

Fabulastic said...

Very good alternatives to Canova.

I am astonish with the virtuosity of the first one - the net detail is unbelievable - but the overall ensemble is too «noisy». If it was just the male figure with the net it would be certainly one of the great masterpieces of the epoch.

Lucy said...

I think Modesty looks very sexy with that concealing revealing drapery on the body, has to have been intentionally so...