Monday, February 9, 2009

Sale on a Fashionista Bookshelf Necessity

I really should be staying one hundred feet away from Amazon at all time but unfortunately I am a moth to the flame. This time I found something that could benefit many. The hardcover version of Caroline Weber's amazing book, Queen of Fashion: What Marie Antoinette Wore to the Revolution is on sale for $8.99. Considering that the paperback is already bargain price of $10.88, I think this is irresistible deal for anyone interested in 18th century fashion.

Lauren and I both had our eye on this book for a while until I finally gave it to her as a gift with her promise of letting me borrow it when she finished. She began reading it right away and zoomed through it, gushing to me all the incredibly interesting facts it contained. I kept reminding her I needed to borrow it when she was done but she could not wait to discuss all the fabulous tid-bits so she just ended up getting me a copy. Once you dip into the book (as I know many of you have) you will probably see the appeal. Weber's book is a biography on Antoinette through her clothes. Although her clothes aren't what defines the unfortunate queen, Weber writes to prove just what kind of an effect they had on her life and the socio-political events of France. You might be surprised just how important they turned out to be.

If you would like a light biography on Marie Antoinette, want to learn more about 18th century fashion without being bored, or are looking to expand your knowledge of Rose Bertin, this book is for you. So why not get a discounted hardcover to grace your library?!

9 comments:

Lauren said...

Le Sigh! I need a new bookshelf!!!!

Eliza Ward said...

Wooh, that sounds interesting!! Thanks for letting me know!

Heather Carroll said...

Oh you should definitely take advantage! I can't promote it enough!

Kira said...

This is hands down my favorite biography of Marie Antoinette!

Heather Carroll said...

Mine too, I only wish there could be one on Georgiana in the same style.

Ingrid Mida said...

I too adored this book and wrote about it on both my fashion blog (Fashion is my Muse) and my book blog (Blog of a Bookworm).

I also attended a lecture given by Caroline Weber at the Royal Ontario Museum and she was a delightful speaker. The photo of her in the book does not do her justice.

Paul Miller said...

I've got to get this book. When I was as young as seven, I was getting books on "costume" from the library to study, trace and draw the dresses. At the time, and for many years, I loved most the big, lavish skirts of Georgian style and later, more American in my mind, the antebellum, sort of Scarlett O'Hara, thing. Since, however, I have realized just how great those simple, Empire-waisted muslin gowns really are. Details like baby doll ruffles on sleeves and dainty needlework on decolletages and hems just seem to stand out even more richly when the silhouette of the gown is so modest and supple.

Heather Carroll said...

I used to do that too! I would take out the huge costume through the ages anthologies and trace the ones I liked best. It had been handy too because doing it from such a young age made it almost second nature for me to date a painting by clothing.

Paul Miller said...

It's nice to know someone else had the same experience. I am pretty good at identifying clothes within a broad period, say 1770's through 1790's, but I can't nail it down to within just a few seasons.
My favorite thing about watching old 30's and 40's costume films is laughing at just how bastardized and horrible their attempts at authenticity are. I think it was Merchant Ivory films in the late 80's that really started to make film makers try harder to get it right. Did you ever see The French Lieutenant's Woman? 70's. Meryl Streep. There's a great cloak in the historic parts. Not ornamental ornamental, just really sweeping and voluminous.